Anca Beudean

Interview

Anca

“My name is Anca, I was born and raised in Transylvania and I long to return there soon, but to travel around as well. I see myself as a puzzle, with pieces that sometimes fit well together, and other times need to be moved (too) many times before I can find their place. Some parts of the puzzle are ready, others I thought I solved but had to reconsider, yet others I have yet to discover. I like this journey but sometimes it is very difficult. I have two children and they are a big joy. Raising them to be fulfilled individuals is possibly the biggest challenge I am facing.”

Anca, what is your personal view of Europe?

I see Europe as a big continent, where people are diverse and mixed. There is a complicated history of religious and territorial wars, the discovery of new continents, of science and art, people moving and pressures to adapt to newcomers and to new host countries respectively. There is a lot to learn and to discover as you travel through Europe and it can be a lifetime challenge whereby you may learn that diversity and alikeness reside in each person you meet.

In your opinion, what does Europe mean for your home country, Romania?

I believe there is not a unitary view of Europe in Romania. Individuals and groups have a different view of Europe depending on education, background, travel and reading experience, interactions with other people from other European countries, media discourse, etc. For politicians, Europe is like a Jolly joker in a game of cards – it may be used to help forward their agenda, whether it is pro or against the democratic establishment. For those who aspire for a better life, Europe may be a new place to travel, study, live and build a future. For those with a more acute civic spirit, Europe may represent a set of institutions they look up to with the hope that European leaders will help civil society change things for the better so that Romania too can become a good place to study, live and build a future. For others, it may be a source of pressures to change, to abide by rules, to open up markets to added competition.

Is there anything else you want to say about Europe?

I hope that despite the current pressures to break up united Europe, this unity will prevail and come out stronger in the process. I think this outcome would be beneficial for individuals across Europe, from the more developed west all the way to the eastern regions.

For politicians, Europe is like a Jolly joker in a game of cards – it may be used to help forward their agenda, whether it is pro or against the democratic establishment.

Anca